Considering taking your bike riding to the next level, but with some concerns?. ….I completely understand your hesitation. I too initially resisted clipless cycling shoes. What if I forgot to unclip? I was nervous about falling off my bike and i believed that clip-in shoes were just for super serious cyclists. But now, I think they are for anyone who plans to do some significant kilometers on their bike. Whether you are a roadie, a trail blaizing explorer or a commuter, a properly fitted cycling shoe can make a significant difference in your performance, comfort and level of satisfaction

So here are some good reasons why you might want to become more attached to your pedals. Clipping in prevents your foot from sliding forward off the pedal when applying power, helps align your foot to ensure maximum efficiency, and aids your pedal stroke by allowing you to pull up on the pedal as well as to push down.Cycling shoes can also help you target your gluts and core better during your workout, since cycling shoes fix your feet into place, it takes a lot of stress off other parts of your body that aren’t necessary for the workout, like your hip flexors and shoulders, for example, and therefore improves the quality of your training session. If you wear sneakers on the bike, you need to make a conscious effort to stay in the proper position; since cycling shoes lock into place, they don’t slip around, which means you’re more likely to stay aligned—and can better avoid ankle, knee, and hip injuries.
Another advantage of clipping in is that it ensures you pedal with the balls of your feet over the center of the pedals ( the optimal cycling position) and not your toes because your foot slipped forward and on the flip side, that you also don’t end up riding with the arch of your foot over the center of the pedals; that also doesn’t feel so great. Clipping in means you avoid both of these situations and ride in comfort.

Essentially there are three types of bike shoes-road, mountain and triathlon; each suited to its own particular cycling discipline and two types of pedals road and mountain bike. Shoes sometimes cross over, but generally I would recommend if you ride road then use road shoes and pedals, and if you ride mountain, use mountain bike shoes and pedals.

Unlike typical sneakers, cycling shoes have a very stiff sole so that the power your leg muscles produce goes directly into the pedal instead of being absorbed by the shoe cushion. This makes it easier to pedal—which means you’re able to dial up the resistance more than you could if you were wearing regular street shoes. The shoe should provide enough room for your toes to spread out but not slosh around, and should secure your heel and foot with ample support and comfort.

Keep in mind, we have a different anatomy compared to men, so manufacturers have developed special women’s shoe to fit our unique anatomic design. Key differences, like the ankle clearance and the size of the heal cup. So make sure you try on a few different styles before you decide which ones are best suited for you. . So how do you know which shoe fits you best? Before you can answer this question, you need to know what kind of cyclist you are. Are you a highly competitive rider who likes to have the best products to beat the competition? Then you will need a stiff shoe with a carbon sole and a good adaptable closure system. Check our FLR FXX II shoe if you’re a competitive type of rider a shoe with an original style and design which optimizes comfort and delivers pure pedaling performance. Are you more into the recreational rides with your girlfriends? Then check out the recently released FLR It’s a great looking shoe with great features and a great price.

Let’s begin our search for the ultimate women’s cycling shoe.

Road shoes have stiff, thin soles. An elite level road shoe has a carbon fiber sole, making them very stiff and light. The stiffer the sole, the less energy you’ll lose between your foot and the pedal.There are different types of closure systems including Velcro straps, ratchet closures and boa dials. You have to find what works best for you. More expensive shoes tend to have boa dials.
Road shoes need to be well-ventilated so your feet don’t overheat in the summer and for the cooler winter months you may want to purchase thermal shoe covers.
The cleats fit externally to the shoes so although they are not ideal for walking for any distance you can buy plastic covers to protect them from damage and give you a smoother gait.

Mountain bike shoes have a stiff sole, though not as rigid as road shoes and the sole is more padded as well. They usually have recessed cleats and serious lug treads. Recessed cleats make walking easy so they are ideal for commuters and others who need to walk any distance with bike shoes on their feet. MTB shoes are also great for spin class and stationary cycling.

Triathlon shoes are similar to road shoes. The main difference is that triathlon shoes are designed to be easily donned and removed, for quick transitions between disciplines. Most triathlon shoes use a single wide Velcro strap to secure your foot. This makes it easy to adjust and undo the strap whilst you are on the bike.
Triathlon shoes also tend to be heavily ventilated, to allow the foot to dry after a swim.

I strongly recommend that you visit a retail shop to buy women’s clip-in cycling shoes because you can try them on and receive advice from the retailer. You might have to visit a few shops to find the right shoes for you but it is worth it if you’re going to invest in a solid pair of shoes, and wear them for hours on the bike. As any
woman knows, you can never have enough shoes! So now that I’ve
brought you up to speed on women’s cycling shoes, buckle up, clip in and get out there: experience how performance cycling shoes will improve your ride on every level!

Designed to be sleek, lightweight and comfortable – road shoes have similar features to mountain bike shoes although there are a few key points to focus on. All road shoes are compatible with road cycling cleats so make sure you choose the right brand and shape of cleat for your given pedals.

MOULDING Similar to your mountain biking shoes, but a little more advanced… Some brands of road shoe offer heat molding! Given you’ll be riding in one position for hours on end, this is not a bad idea.
Unlike mountain biking where you stand and sit frequently, road shoes require you to be comfortable in just one position for long periods of time. You can usually remold the shoe a handful of times, so you don’t have to panic if you don’t get it right the first time.
SOLE MATERIAL Road shoes do require a little more stiffness than off-road shoes, purely because the rest of your bike is 100% performance based. Stiff wheels, stiff frame, but flexible shoes? If you want to cash in on the performance advancements of your bike we strongly suggest even some entry level carbon soled shoes. They’re not much more expensive than their plastic counterparts, but worth every cent.
HOW MANY STRAPS Road cycling shoes tend to offer a greater variety of strap numbers than their off-road counterparts. For instance, a triathlon shoe can easily be mistaken for a road shoe and only has one very large Velcro strap. Other lower quality road shoes may only have two straps, but after riding in the rain and road grime, these straps can offer little shoe tension. Again we recommend opting for one ratchet strap, and two Velcro straps (per shoe).
REPLACEABLE HEEL GRIPS Given you may be moving slightly when you put a foot down at an intersection it is possible to grind away the heel of your shoe (by accident of course). Some shoes offer a replaceable external heel gripper because the shoes will outlast the grippers.
This is a good option but not a crucial point in buying new shoes.
BREATHABILITY Road shoes should always have good ventilation, to help keep you comfortable on a hot day. Check to see if your chosen shoes have sufficient ventilation netting, as well as holes cut into the sole of some shoes.

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